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Video: "Boy, He Big Boy!" Large Hammerhead Shark At Montagu

A LARGE hammerhead shark swam up to the beach at Montagu on Friday afternoon, causing much excitement for onlookers and local vendors.

"Boy, he big boy!” was the cry from people who watched as the shark moved in close to the shore, probably trying to find stingrays on which to prey, although there were suggestions that offal from the fish cleaning on the market side of the dock had attracted it.

Concerned parents called their children out of the water once the shark's fin broke the surface near the shoreline. Some observers estimated the shark's size at between 14 and 16 feet.

Comments

SP 3 years, 1 month ago

"Why" is a very good question. More importantly, he most likely will return!

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themessenger 3 years, 1 month ago

What else do you expect with a fish and conch market right next to the public swimming area. The vendors throw fish guts and conch slop overboard there every day and sharks and other marine life are naturally attracted by this. Where else in the world would a government situate a fish market immediately adjacent to a public beach? Only in the Bahamas!! The next step of course will be to kill the sharks, go figure.........

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B_I_D___ 3 years, 1 month ago

Mission accomplished...the shark is dead...our lawless society...

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ThisIsOurs 3 years, 1 month ago

Maybe he came for shark week

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ThisIsOurs 3 years, 1 month ago

Hmmm and I was saying earlier, thank God they didn't terrorize the shark only to find out they terrorized the shark. Weird that they don't see the connection between dumping "bait" right on the shore and attracting large fish or the things large fish feed on

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Reality_Check 3 years, 1 month ago

Anyone seen little Joey? He was wading in the water with his pale full of sand and shovel in hand.

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B_I_D___ 3 years, 1 month ago

...that shark was killed today, despite it being illegal...willing to bet nothing is done by any of our enforcement agencies...

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sovereign 3 years, 1 month ago

you can kill a human in self defense how much less a shark that is a clear and present fanger : get a grip!

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sheeprunner12 3 years, 1 month ago

I am surprised that the boys in the video were not paulting the shark with rocks or conch shells when it was posted ............ that is the general Bahamian natural reaction to these creatures

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sovereign 3 years, 1 month ago

i saw you men and gron in the video dont recall seeing boys but of course some people certain people through their innate prejudice!

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John 3 years, 1 month ago

The problem with sharks is they have no natural predator. When the government banned the killing of sharks some 7 years ago, their numbers increased. If you go fishing these days sharks will come around the boat and take whatever fish you catch because fish is scarce in many areas of the Bahamas due to over fishing and because much of the coral reefs are dying due to pollution and illegal bleaching. Many ships spill oil and fuel in the oceans and others empty their sewerage tanks rather then having to pay to dump it on land. Like humans, sharks look for an easy way to get food, so some will even follow fishing boats and let the fishermen catch their food for them. Since the killing of sharks is illegal, the boats can only keep moving until the lose the sharks or let them take the fish until they feed and swim away. It is unusual for a shark that size to swim into shallow waters, especially a hammerhead. Usually when that happens the shark is either sick or disorientated or suffering from old age. In most cases it will eventually die.

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B_I_D___ 3 years, 1 month ago

You obviously know nothing about hammerheads then...they frequently come into shallow waters in search of their natural prey...the stingray.

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John 3 years, 1 month ago

"Hammerhead sharks are known to eat a large range of prey including fish, squid, octopus, crustaceans, and other sharks. Stingrays are a particular favorite. These sharks are often found swimming along the bottom of the ocean, stalking their prey. Their unique head is used as a weapon when hunting down prey. The hammerhead shark uses its head to pin down stingrays and eats the ray when the ray is weak and in shock.[11] "

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sealice 3 years, 1 month ago

the only time i have ever seen great hammer heads is with the dorsal fins out pushing over sandbanks in exuma and in abaco - that one was looking for a place to drop it's PUP's though - they wouldn't normally cruise around nassau looking for food... to many assholes

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truetruebahamian 3 years, 1 month ago

Let the law befollowed and prosecute, fine and lock up those who killed the shark.

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B_I_D___ 3 years, 1 month ago

The term 'ocean' in your reference is very misleading...they are 'ocean' dwellers...ie not lake or pond dwellers...but their habitat is shallow water and reefs...

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John 3 years, 1 month ago

Strangely there was a documentary on sharks last night. Not only are hammerhead sharks now starting to pry shallow waters but also the lemon shark and the tiger shark. In fact there is a small cay off West End, Grand Bahama where there are so many tiger sharks the Cay is nicknamed "Tiger Beach." Sharks that normally live in waters over 1,000 feet deep have migrated to places like "Tiger Beach" and Montague, where the water is under 17 feet. Stingrays are known to frequent Montague but researchers believe sharks are being attracted to shallow waters because of free feeding by diving tours, among other things like warmer ocean currents. The second part of this series is suppose to air tonight on discovery channel. "

Blockquote Shallow Water Invasion Using a self-propelled shark cage called “The Explorer”, marine biologists Mauricio Hoyos and Grant Johnson will investigate a recent discovery at Guadalupe Island – great whites moving into shallow waters at night. This movement shows that sharks entering shallow water are normal behavior – which would account for some of the shark encounters happening with greater frequency in the shallows along coastlines. Blockquote

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