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Nema Confirms Islands Spared The Worst Of Cristobal

THE National Emergency Management Agency (NEMA) has confirmed that the islands in the projected path of Tropical Storm Cristobal fared well during the passage of the fourth named storm of the 2014 Atlantic Hurricane Season.

On Monday, First Assistant Secretary at NEMA Chrystal Glinton said that Family Island administrators reported very little impact, with the exception of flooding of the road in Mayaguana between Pirate’s Well and Abraham’s Bay.

By Sunday afternoon, the Bahamas Department of Meteorology issued tropical storm warnings for the Central and Southeast Bahamas, which included Acklins, Crooked Island, Long Cay, Ragged Island, Mayaguana, Inagua, Cat Island, the Exumas, Long Island, Rum Cay and San Salvador.

Over a 48-hour period, Tropical Storm Cristobal was expected to produce rainfall of four to eight inches over the Southeast and Central Bahamas, and the Turks and Caicos Islands.

“NEMA monitored the system because there was going to be severe water fall resulting in flooding,” Ms Glinton said. “But those islands were not impacted.”

She explained that those islands were in a state of readiness and the Emergency Operation Centres on each island were prepared to partially activate or fully activate, if there was a need to do so.

NEMA advised residents that the hurricane season is at its peak time and all the necessary preparations should be in place in the event the country is faced with a storm.

The Atlantic Hurricane Season is from June 1 to November 30. Weather experts predict eight to 13 named storms (with winds of 39 mph or higher), of which three to six could become hurricanes (with winds of 74 mph or higher), including one to two major hurricanes (with winds of 111 mph or higher).

The 2014 Atlantic Hurricane Season named storms are Arthur, Bertha, Cristobal, Dolly, Edouard, Fay, Gonzalo, Hanna, Isaias, Josephine, Kyle, Laura, Marco, Nana, Omar, Paulette, Rene, Sally, Teddy, Vicky, and Wilfred.

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