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Referendum crumbling under political opportunism

JUST as forecast, support for the upcoming constitutional referendum has crumbled under the weight of political opportunism. What was initially pitched as a benign and straightforward bid to remove discrimination against women, has lit the stage for exploitation and fear mongering. Now contentious, the bills have been fated to a caustic half-life that has once again exposed the political cannibalism and unbridled personal ambition that have long characterised the country’s democratic system.

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INSIGHT: Leading questions

THE government last week added another level of uncertainty and ambiguity to the already emotionally-charged proposed constitutional vote by suggesting the process may be abandoned all together, despite its assurances to Bahamian women of its commitment to gender equality.

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A change 'long overdue'

Twelve years ago, on the night of February 27, 2002, thousands of jubilant supporters of the Progressive Liberal Party celebrated on the grounds of Gambier House after it became clear that the Ingraham administration’s constitutional referendum, which aimed in part to obliterate discrimination against women in the Constitution, had failed.

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Truth, misdirection and stealth in the rise of Obama's socialist state

Far from being a moderate, Barack Obama is a polarising United States president. Ralph J Massey, an American writer living in the Bahamas, examines Marxist influences in his background and how it has been kept hidden from the public.

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Playing on the global stage should be the goal

IT is difficult to say how much the 2014 FIFA World Cup has really impacted the Bahamas, a country that is not a “footballing country” and where the global sport has to be purchased from the local cable company to be viewed. I find that absolutely appalling: the world’s game should be free.

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Struggle for gender equality

As the country gears up to celebrate its 41st anniversary of independence this week, it is clear that Bahamians do have many reasons to be thankful. We have a stable government, the stagnant economy appears to be slowly getting better and while crime and a high rate of joblessness continue to plague our country, things are not so bad.

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The perfect predator

The beautiful but voracious lionfish are now threatening the Gulf of Mexico ecosystem. Pam LeBlanc says that eradicating them is impossible - and if you can’t beat them, eat them

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Can anyone fill the prime minister's shoes?

ALTHOUGH the next general election is some three years away, speculation is rife about who will lead both major political parties into the fight in 2017.

Fear and loathing in the Bahamas

AN OFTEN overused term in political and legal spheres is that “justice must satisfy the appearance of justice”. Just as critical as the need for the courts to appear to be free from political impunity, the police must also appear to be fair and transparent in its administration of the law. Both play a critical role in maintaining law and order and in fostering respect for law and order - an interdependent cycle.

European elections will be defining moment for UKIP

IN THE run-up to the European Parliament election this week the debate in Britain about the European Union (EU) has taken centre stage. The impetus has been the emergence of a new political party – the United Kingdom Independence Party, known as UKIP, whose principal aim is to secure Britain’s withdrawal from the EU.

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ARAGONITE: ALWAYS A BRIDESMAID BUT NEVER A BRIDE

Suddenly there is renewed new interest in aragonite and a belief this natural resource could pay off the national debt. Bill Bardelmeier draws on history to urge caution.

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Media freedom for a better Bahamas

NEWS media practitioners in the Bahamas have broad shoulders. Newspaper readers lament sensationalist slant while chastising journalists for not tackling more controversial topics.

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LGBT community: Too tiny to count?

THIS is the second time in my life that I’ve agreed with the Bahamas Christian Council on an issue. Our first mutual agreement came earlier in our conversation when Rev Patterson said that Bahamians were too passive. Try not to be too shocked, times are changing. As the vocal religious community shouts at an even smaller yet silent advocacy grouping, has anyone ever bothered to ask the Bahamian people how they feel?

Slaves to a new 'massa'

BAHAMIANS are not adequately critical of authority. We are subservient to it. We fear it. We are awed by title, wealth, social station, pomp and circumstance.BAHAMIANS are not adequately critical of authority. We are subservient to it. We fear it. We are awed by title, wealth, social station, pomp and circumstance.

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'Spoken from the heart' - Tribute to Edmund Moxey by Sir Arthur Foulkes

GOVERNOR General Sir Arthur Foulkes, in a tribute paid to Edmund Moxey, creator of the Jumbey Village dream, recalled their years in the political trenches together, nourishing a single ambition – the “salvation of a people.”

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