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Judge To Rule On Legal Discussions In Murder Trial

By LAMECH JOHNSON

Tribune Staff Reporter

ljohnson@tribunemedia.net

A JUDGE is expected to rule today on legal discussions held in the trial of a man who allegedly murdered a schoolboy who had attacked his neighbour over a pair of stolen Oakley sunglasses.

Justice Vera Watkins required the remainder of yesterday afternoon to consider the arguments raised on Thursday morning by Crown and counsel for the accused in the absence of the jury concerning Charles Hanna Jr’s case.

The discussions between prosecutor Raquel Whymms and the lawyer for the accused man, Romona Farquharson-Seymour, took up the morning and mid-afternoon session of court.

Hanna Jr denies that he intentionally killed Jarvell Gardiner on November 22, 2012.

Gardiner, a 17-year-old student of C C Sweeting High School, was shot on Hawthorne Road after he and three others confronted a man he believed had robbed his younger brother as he walked to school.

During testimony, police investigator Corporal Keith Martin said Hanna Jr admitted to killing Gardiner after his neighbour had been attacked by him and others on his property.

However, the detective admitted that he did not write down Hanna’s statement that he would not have aided his neighbour if he had known he had stolen from the group.

On Thursday afternoon, the statement of Kimble McPhee - the neighbour in question – was read into evidence by Cpl Martin as the witness could not be located to give sworn evidence.

In his statement, McPhee said that a man named Jason had robbed the student of the sunglasses and had given them to him after Jason and the schoolboy’s scuffle was broken up.

He returned the sunglasses after being approached later that day by the schoolboy and others accompanying him armed with a pipe and bottles. He was still attacked despite walking away. During this time, he saw Hanna with a shotgun and as he ran through a short cut, he heard gunfire.

The Crown then closed its case.

Hanna Jr may be called to testify. However, he has the right to remain silent and rely on the case the Crown has put forward.

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