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Software Developer: Tax Woe Drove Us To Cayman

By NEIL HARTNELL

Tribune Business Editor

nhartnell@tribunemedia.net

A Bahamian software developer yesterday revealed he was forced to domicile in the Cayman Islands to prevent VAT and Business License fees "killing" his competitiveness.

Bruce Raine, International Private Banking Systems (IPBS) principal, told Tribune Business that his company's experience showed that the Government needed to enact multiple, far-reaching economic reforms that extend way beyond the Commercial Enterprises Bill.

IPBS, which develops specialist software for the international financial services industry, straddles two of the sectors targeted by the Bill - financial services and technology.

But, while welcoming the legislation and its 'fast track' work permit process as "a step in the right direction", Mr Raine argued it was not enough by itself to attract foreign direct investment (FDI) from such sectors.

He said "the bigger problem" was the Bahamas' high costs for doing business, together with a tax structure that undermined the price competitiveness of companies such as his when compared to international rivals.

Pointing out that IPBS was involved in a high margin, value-added sector, Mr Raine said it was at a competitive disadvantage versus overseas rivals when selling software to Bahamas-based financial services providers because it had to pay 7.5 per cent Value-Added Tax (VAT) on the deal.

Foreign competitors faced no such tax burden, he added, with the Bahamas' Business License fees further undermining IPBS's cost competitiveness. To escape these pressures, Mr Raine said he was forced to establish a Cayman Islands-based company to own IPBS' software, and handle all sales and licensing functions.

IPBS's development functions remain in the Bahamas, but Mr Raine said he "couldn't see" how foreign-owned technology companies targeted by the Bill would be attracted here unless such issues were corrected. "What I had to do to get around VAT and Business License fees was to domicile a company in Cayman, and that company owns it [the software]. We license and sell it out of Cayman," the IPBS chief told Tribune Business.

"We develop it here, but can't sell it as a Bahamian product to a Bahamian bank, asset manager or mutual fund companies. You would have to add VAT to it, and have had these huge Business License fees. Cayman has a flat Business License fee.

"If I can't see the competitiveness of being in the Bahamas as a Bahamian, I don't know how foreigners are going to see it. If someone is coming here to develop and sell software, I can't see how they're going to do it unless they're VAT 'exempt' or 'zero rated'. These are the things that kill it."

Mr Raine said he had considered moving IPBS from Nassau to Freeport, but abandoned the plan when he realised VAT was also levied in the Port area.

He pointed out that 7.5 per cent VAT on a $200,000 software system totalled $15,000 - a significant cost that foreign rivals did not have to charge to Bahamas-based financial institutions.

"I looked at one time domiciling in Freeport, but some of the things the Government doesn't understand, and never has," Mr Raine told Tribune Business. "I thought I could do it up in Freeport, but it was not possible because you've still got VAT up there.

"I'm in the business of developing software and selling it at a high price. Here's my problem. My competitors around the world, if they want to sell a system to a bank or asset manager in the Bahamas, they don't have to charge VAT. I would have to charge VAT."

While praising the Government's efforts to innovate via the Commercial Enterprises Bill, Mr Raine said it only fixed one aspect of the Bahamas' 'ease of doing business' woes - certainty surrounding the granting of work permits.

"I see the inherent problems for someone coming in to do business here," he added. "We have high electricity costs, and Business License fees are a monster. We've got to reduce the cost of doing business.

"These things have to happen, otherwise no one is going to come here if they have to pay for electricity, and pay for office space and staff. They're [the Government] creating the mechanism, but whether we have the product to sell I don't know.

"It's [the Commercial Enterprises Bill] the fundamental level of legislation for people to come in, or even think about coming in, but next we have to find out how to reduce the cost of doing business in this little country. That's the bigger problem," Mr Raine continued.

"It's a great idea, and hopefully people will come, but as soon as they come they're going to say: 'How much is it going to cost me to run this office for a month with security?' All these little things are what's killing this country, I'm sorry to say. There are other things we need to fix."

Mr Raine said exchange control liberalisation was vital to enabling Bahamian businesses to compete with foreign rivals when it came to the cost of, and access to, capital.

He added that 'quality of life' issues would also impact investor decisions on whether to invest in the Bahamas, questioning whether any thought had been given to addressing Nassau's 'rush hour' traffic congestion that results in tremendous productivity losses.

Comments

OldFort2012 1 week, 4 days ago

All very true. Radical root and branch reform is needed. However no one in their right mind is going to come here to sell anything in the Bahamas. All the software will be for export and via IBCs, surely? That way VAT and business licence will not apply.

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The_Oracle 1 week, 4 days ago

Bruce is correct: Government, rightly wanting to entice Tech companies to our shores promptly build a box hoping they'll jump in. They won't. You don't structure or confine these tech guys. They are a constantly moving dynamic. Their markets are global. Second point is the "strangulation" of business in the Bahamas is directly tied into the "control/deny Psych pervasive throughout the Government and civil service. There is no interaction with Government that is painless. That is what needs fixing.

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Islangal1 4 days, 15 hours ago

Our politicians have no vision because they are so used to fooling Bahamians they believe they can fool the world into jumping in the same pot!! Trust me you have 15yr old Foreign kids who can see through this sham. I really don't understand why our Politicians came come out of the dark ages and into the 21st Century. Who's advising them in all this foolishness though.

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John 1 week, 3 days ago

The Americans came here and tried (almost successfully ) to shut down every single farm in the country. They discouraged Bahamians from fishing and we are now at the point that we are 100% depending on their food supply and energy. And what is it causing us? Bahamians are dropping down like flies. They have become predators and are killing one another. Is America really our big brother? Are they looking out for us or is America our most dangerous and lethal enemy? A wolf dressed in sheeps clothing. ‘ My sheep know my voice...’

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sheeprunner12 1 week, 3 days ago

What is your solution?????? ........ Canada, China, EU, ANZ, Cuba, CARICOM?????? ........ We need to take national initiative - but can you trust our politicians to stand up to these OECD bullies???????

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OMG 1 week, 2 days ago

Not entirely true. Hatchet Bay had a very sucessful farm suplying the island and run by sn American compan. Independance came and lets throw the foeigners out and replace them with inexperienced PLP supporters. End result , once sucessful local industry bankrupt and cloed down

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Economist 1 week, 2 days ago

You are correct. In the 1960's we (the Bahama Islands) got our milk, eggs and chicken from Hatchet Bay.

It was ruined by the PLP and their immigration policy.

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jamaicaproud 1 week, 2 days ago

Self-inflicted misery. If I came and say opened a hatchery eggs, etc. Then you would not have to import and pay crazy duty. It would be better. Benefits come not only with jobs but reduced costs. I take a pass though.

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ThisIsOurs 1 week, 1 day ago

High cost of business including land , labour, bank and govt fees added to low population, you may not be able to sell those eggs cheaply

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DDK 1 week, 1 day ago

True, but that was also back in the good old days before the internet and global huge corporate greed, which was prototyped in the great U.S. of A.

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banker 1 week, 3 days ago

Cayman is eating our lunch in every way. I am amazing at the high level Fintech initiatives going on there. They have the jumpstart on us in every single way, including Blockchain in the Financial Services industry. There will be nothing left here.

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observer2 1 week, 3 days ago

Alibaba the Chinese internet giant and one of the largest companies in the world by market cap is domiciled in Cayman.

Indeed most multi jurisdictional asset managers have long since redomicled their software input vendors out of the Bahamas, such as Bloomberg since the advent of VAT. Most are now safely in Cayman.

Our dumb dumb politicians recognize that financial services is dying but are clueless as to how to rectify it.

I’m actually shocked that the VAT enforcement unit hasn’t collapsed Bruce’s structure for tax purposes as “mind and management” is still in the Bahamas.

Most clients would have physically moved to Cayman before the VAT enforcement unit shuts down their international structure.

If VAT doesn’t get you the archaic exchange control laws will sooner or later block this Bahamian from countined success.

Yes, let’s just issue a bunch of work permits to foreigners to increase economic activity benefiting the monopolies (and a dozen Bay St and Sunshine families) such as the container port, oil imports, big box retail, government, BEC, BTC/Cable and the bank cartel.

I maybe black and Bahamian but not as dumb as you tink I is.

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DDK 1 week, 1 day ago

So after the likes of OECD, WTO, IMF, ECB, etc. exert relentless pressure to ram VAT,income tax, austerity programmes, banking restrictions, down a country's throat, and their victim has capitulated and folded, they come in like sharks to feed on the remains..

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ThisIsOurs 1 week, 3 days ago

"see the inherent problems for someone coming in to do business here," he added. "We have high electricity costs, and Business License fees are a monster. We've got to reduce the cost of doing business."

So what I gather is, if we want these businesses to come here we have to allow them to operate VAT fee and with reduced business licenses. They will buy about 5 computers from the US, pay a one time customs fee on that, oh , no customs duty on computers I forgot, pay a one time investment inclusive of their building rental and office furniture and hire five expats, who don't have to live here...this does not sound like high paying jobs for Bahamians or contribution to the economy.

A lot of prominent persons got wealthy from shares at the port but Freeport, thats structured just like this bill, was left to die. A few people will get wealthy exploiting the concessions in this bill. It was not structured for the good of the Bahamas. As I've said from last week, I got the distinct impression that this bill has been structured to help one or two persons in or wanting to get in software development that were in discussion with the govt PRIOR to the election.

Also from what I gather from this story. IPBS' profits will increase with no material impact on the economy. Who's living here is here and who isn't isn't. The only difference is the registration, no VAT, reduced business license.

The main issue I have with Dr Minnis is he executes based on very little research. People keep talking about how wonderful it is in Cayman, I bet there's been very little research on what makes Cayman so wonderful vs what makes the Bahamas so laggy then taking a holistic approach to address the gaps. No we see the surface and believe that if we change the things on the surface we'll be suddenly competitive.

In 5 years IPBS and it's 5 employees will get richer. The Bahama Islands and her remaining 399,995 people will look the same.

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sheeprunner12 1 week, 3 days ago

First of all ....... Cayman Islands is a British territory ........ an OECD country ......... Secondly, Bahamians must look to INVEST in sectors of their country that will reduce imports ...... Thirdly, until we reform our public sector and change our tax codes to lower fuel costs and labour costs, we will always remain non-competitive ........ We sold out on our "tax free status" because of OECD pressure and now the OECD (like Cayman) is eating our lunch.

BTW: Bruce Raine may have a financial point, but I question his nationalist spirit.

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hrysippus 1 week, 1 day ago

Hey Sheep, Do you prefer the "nationalist spirit" shown by Shameless, Late again, BB the bag man, the frequent flier, The scaredy cat, and list goes on?

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ThisIsOurs 1 week, 1 day ago

No he probably doesn't, that doesn't prevent him from telling this administration, "do better"... I also question whether Mr Raine has any faith in black Bahamians. I know of another very rich white Bahamian who is constantly saying if he had it his way he'd hire all foreigners. That person is in full control now.

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TalRussell 1 week, 3 days ago

Comrades! How is it that the Bahamalander software developer were forced to domicile in the Cayman Islands to prevent VAT and Business License fees "killing" his competitiveness.... yet their Headquarters listed on their webpage reads:

International Private Banking Systems, Ltd. IPBS House No. 3 Moseley Lane P. O. Box N 1013 Nassau, Bahamaland 1(242) 394-6420

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John2 1 week, 2 days ago

Simple comrade ...."IPBS's development functions remain in the Bahamas" ....but :Mr Raine said he was forced to establish a Cayman Islands-based company to own IPBS' software, and handle all sales and licensing functions".......its like you can grow bananas in cat island and sell them in nassau

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ThisIsOurs 1 week, 2 days ago

And the truth is, he doesn't intend to hire or train any Bahamians if this bill passes, now, 2 years from now or ten years from now. He will continue to tell Minnis and whoever else isnt aware, that there are no Bahamian programmers, programming is simply too far above us. They will believe him and pass more laws to suit one individuals business model. Nano technology...they'd be laughed out the room if they approached any nanotechnology firm with an incentive of paying only 250,000 to setup

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RaineSean 1 week, 1 day ago

Actually since Mr. Raine formed the company in 1993 it has been staffed entirely by Bahamians. Many employees have been hired directly out of COB and gotten their real world experience and developer skills through the company. Unfortunately we suffer like many Bahamian companies from brain drain and have lost Bahamian developers to overseas companies who can pay more and offer a better quality of life. At least 20 Bahamians have been employed by IPBS over the years and there is no intention of ever hiring any foreigners. From our experience there is plenty of talent to choose from locally.

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ThisIsOurs 1 week, 1 day ago

That's good to heard RaineSean...I take it from this that at least 80% of the developers are Bahamian and in fact Senior developers and there are no plans to change that after the bill is passed. In that case I take everything I said back, Mr Raine needs to speak with Carl Bethel, because him, Brent Symonnete, Kwasi Thompson and Elswoth Johnson were all over the airwaves saying we had no developers here. Please let them know we don't have to import talent in Software design or development, local developers could use some incentives though if we really want to grow this ICT sector

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RaineSean 1 week ago

100% of the developers are Bahamian, senior and junior. Management and ownership is also 100% Bahamian. While there are developers here in the Bahamas, it takes anywhere from 1 to 2 years of training for them to become an asset to the company. There is a tremendous learning curve where they need to learn not only how to write code efficiently but also the world of finance. If a developer does not know how to do the accounting for processing the income on a stock dividend then there is no way he or she can write the code to do it. Many of Mr. Raine's former employee's have gone on to jobs with high finance companies both here and abroad having learned a great deal about the business from Mr. Raine.

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ThisIsOurs 6 days, 22 hours ago

That is wonderful news and I mean that sincerely. What you've just detailed says, you have more than an adequate supply of software developers for your thriving business and that they are capable of learning new skills. And your training of ?Bahamians is to such a standard that they are sought out by major finance companies.

PLEASE ask RaineBruce to tell this story to Dr Minnis, Brent ?Symonnette, Kwasi Thompson, Carl Bethel and Eksworth Johnson,these men continue to repeat the lie that there are no programmers in the Bahamas, when pressed they reluctantly say , well there are a few... They haven't even asked or checked. The bill was extremely sloppy, what was the rush? Based on your account I'm even more convinced that this bill has nothing to do with Bahamian employment.

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ThisIsOurs 1 week, 2 days ago

The difference between the rest of the Caribbean and us is, they are ready for competition. Why? Theyve made deliberate investments in the training of their people. And their training goes beyond teaching people how to smile and say please and thank you.

When the investor comes in, they cant use the argument that they have to import their entire workforce to be profitable. This model of "hoping" Bahamians will get trained by some nice foreigner on a work permit willing to share knowledge will never work. It didnt work under the past more stringent labour laws and it wont work under this sloppily written bill. Bahamians will fall further and further behind forced into more and more menial jobs as the rich get richer. And the outcome of that pattern is predictable, just examine history.

Its also instructive that the thing we HAD to do for the good of the country I.e. VAT, is the thing that drove ipbs away. What will be the unintended consequences of this next we have to do bill

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sheeprunner12 1 week, 2 days ago

True ............ how can a country depend on the foreign investor to train the native Bahamian to run his business ........ and lose his single most important leverage that he has (control of the employees) ........ then the unions want to tell the investor what to do with his money ............ These investors are not Jesus ......... only those who are getting MORE tax breaks than it costs to stay here will invest in The Bahamas (what's the point???).

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jamaicaproud 1 week, 2 days ago

No serious investor wants to control employees. They want a viable business model and competent employees. I am giving you ideas, but you reject it. In most Carib countries there is an excess of talent few jobs. The Bahamas has an excess of opportunities but need more workers who are ready for emerging industries. You guys can travel to other islands to get trained, Some of our guys can travel to your island and work. Lets be clear, most Jamaicans I know don't want any permanent residency, they just want an opportunity to "build a house back home." Sitting back and doing nothing will not help.

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sheeprunner12 1 week, 2 days ago

The Bahamas has enough native unskilled talent to be trained for many technical and vocational jobs ......... what we need is a niche market in non-tourism sectors to provide new streams of T&V jobs to engage our U30 population ......... That is the age-group that Brent must attract FDI for. We do not need any more unskilled foreigners coming to The Bahamas at this time.

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jamaicaproud 1 week, 2 days ago

You obviously didn't read what I wrote. Invite Carib outsiders on short term assignments specifically to train your workers in technical fields. Furniture, Metalworking,Machining Welding etc.

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OMG 1 week, 2 days ago

This inefficiency is reflected at every level. Take the licensing of a motor vehicle if you are a foreign home owner or foreigner thats rents forbthe winter months. The homeowners have to show proof of paying property taxes - fair enough but what about long term regular renters who keep a car here but don't own the property.? Yes it can be licensed but after much toil and effort. Having lived here all my life the number of foreign homeowners selling up is staggering and they all say the same thing " ridiculously high cost of everything (milk almost $12 a gallon) to the most common statement " I have had enough".

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sheeprunner12 1 week, 2 days ago

Who buys the foreign homeowners homes when they "sell out" and leave the country????? ............. I would like to hear what happens in another Out Island.

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jamaicaproud 1 week, 2 days ago

You will be surprised to know in Jamaica, people can lease rent or buy without hassle. Many expatriates elect to stay and there are few barriers to prevent them. Typically they become ingrained in the community, not only jobs but good works, community involvement.

We are able to see the benefit of outsiders bringing capital and ideas. If people elect to leave, there is always a market for high-end homes in desirable places. Ok yes some riff raff may come to your country but Jamaica is not as bad as it is made out to be(though we wish it were better). Many expatriates actually come on short-term assignments and try to figure out, how they can stay. Because there is a skilled workforce typically only Top Management who has to watch the dollars is there long term. Jamaicans typically rise through the ranks. None of the overseas banks have foreign managers.

The issue with the new set of Chinese is different, because we don't know where they come from, how they get concessions, and who funds them, they are rude and do not participate in the community, however they can't change the structure and culture of the country.

So in a nutshell, people can invest freely with no residence issues. If their children are born there, they can acquire citizenship if they choose, and we view them as such.

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JohnDoe 1 week, 2 days ago

The structure Mr. Raine notes above is quite common as it relates to Intellect Property domicile, the ownership of work product rights and its licencing arrangements. Therefore, this Bill in question in its current form as a vehicle to attract software developers in any meaningful way is almost laughable if the situation were not so serious. Software Developers, who are actually developing work product and earning money now will likely already have a similar structure in place because they can actually develop the work product any where in the world, however, the Intellectual property ownership and work product and licensing rights can be domiciled somewhere else. Therefore, they can accomplish the very same benefits through the structuring of corporate legal entities with no need to move a single natural person or require a single work permit. Their decision to move to and or work from the Bahamas is usually based on other considerations which is where our competitiveness, the quality and cost of living and ease of doing business issues are important.

Having said all of that, the larger strategic issue with this approach is that it is just not a sustainable value proposition or business model in the current international regulatory and compliance environment. The focus of de-risking and harmful tax practices on independent Caribbean OFCs is not coincidental and will not abate until either there is complete transparency of the financial activities of the citizens the G7 nations or the OFC in question is pronounced dead and not dying as the PM stated. Further, the field will never be level and the goal post will continue to be moved such that the OFC will never really be in full compliance no matter how much they co-operate.

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OldFort2012 1 week, 2 days ago

What you say is true of Americans but of no one else on this planet. This is because USA has universal tax (you pay in the US regardless of where you live) while the rest of the world pays tax on domicile base.

Therefore a European who physically moves to the Bahamas and spends less than 90 days in his home country will become domiciled here for income tax purposes. This is not tax evasion. It is perfectly legal and there are dozens of people already here and doing it, perfectly legally.

While all you say about competitiveness in absolutely true, many people are going to save millions by physically relocating here and carrying on business from here. While they will be unlikely to expand their business base much in the Bahamas, until many other areas are addressed (as you say), this is a necessary and welcome first step. But only a baby step.

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JohnDoe 1 week, 2 days ago

You do realize that there is a difference between a natural person and a legal personality and between personal income taxes and corporate taxes.

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OldFort2012 1 week, 1 day ago

Of course I do :)

It is precisely because of that and the current stance of European tax authorities that it is imperative for the person controlling the business to be physically located outside of the EU country. The company controlling the intellectual rights may as well be located on Mars. Their argument is that all income derived from it to the controlling shareholder is subject to taxation in that jurisdiction, if he is resident for tax purposes. Therefore physically moving is the only legal and valid option. Quite a few examples of that already happening here: owners of EU businesses physically residing here for 9 months of the year. This is the logical next step: while you are here, expand your business here. It will suit some, not others.

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TalRussell 1 week, 2 days ago

Comrades! When compared to all the other countries in the region we compete against, the Bahamaland is acknowledged as being exactly 22.45 miles economically in front of all others....it's just we keep electing to govern us the kinds men's and woman's who wish return as back to the 1800's plantation group islands. We need Royal Commission to look into how some peoples huge wealths were accumulated?

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JohnDoe 1 week, 2 days ago

Agree. In 2017 for persons to openly say that this Bill will produce jobs for Bahamian cleaners, maids and secretaries and think that is ok as a government policy is beyond an abomination.

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Dawes 1 week ago

Thats right, the Government must ensure that all Bahamians are owners of their own companies, and nothing else . Of course the problem will be who will be the workers at these companies, but we can deal with that once we all own our own company.

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sheeprunner12 1 week, 2 days ago

What will be the time frame for the Royal Commission?????? ....... Since 1984????? ......... or 2012??????? ............ CEZs will open up new wealth for Bahamians if it is allowed to be used to provide for joint ventures as well.

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hrysippus 1 week, 2 days ago

Those of us who know Bruce Raine,................ .... Know he's been blessed with a very smart brain... ....... He has had to move his business abroad,.. ............ Government taxes he couldn't afford......................... .......... When the rest of our good men have left,,..... ........... And Inland revenue is bereft......... ....... Of all the contributions they could have made, . ..... then this the time to be fiscally afraid. .. .....

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ThisIsOurs 1 week, 1 day ago

He doesn't have a very high opinion of Bahamians ...Bahamians piss me off sometimes too, but one thing I do know, a brain that isn't marijuana and drug dulled is trainable. That's my beef with him, he believes his only option is foreign.

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banker 1 week, 1 day ago

His only option is survival. I wouldn't want to be writing private banking software in this climate of the whole world being against private banks and wealth management.

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TalRussell 1 week, 1 day ago

Comrade ThisIsOurs, please do tell Tribune readers you didn't intentionally intend to have dulled-down the brains those natives who just may be under the influences they's 'specially' home baked Brownies?

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Dawes 1 week, 1 day ago

Yes it is too expensive to operate a business over here. However how does VAT play into this? If you develop the software here and sell overseas it is VAT exempt as it is leaving the country. If you sell it to a company here, assuming their revenue is over $100,000 they can claim the VAT amount back and offset it against their VAT outputs. Yes it has increased the workload but not dramatically. Though it would be better if Government gets any VAT refunds back to the companies in a quicker manner, as i hear it takes months to get that back (if your inputs are more then your outputs.

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ThisIsOurs 1 week, 1 day ago

This is the Bruce raine Bill. From the moment I read it I thought it really weird that "software development" was included. Said as much to a friend the day it was bring debated. Prior to that there were all these subtle hints that the Bahamas had no programmers. The "BRCEB". Now Bethell has actually stated, you can't make this upI, he's trying to help software firms...you can't make this up.

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banker 1 week, 1 day ago

Why aren't the legions of software developers in the Bahamas starting technology businesses?

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Chucky 1 week ago

Will someone please address the hiring foreigners issue honestly for once and for all.

If someone wants to hire foreigners, whether Bahamian owned company, or foreign owned, they must have reasons.

Foreign workers cost more, and must also bring some baggage; i.e. the need to take time off to travel home from time to time, they require permits (which are a hassle to get), and they need time to get accustomed to our Islands.

So if foreigners cost more, bring baggage, need permits, usually are supplied vehicles and housing, private medical etc etc etc

Why would anyone want them given all this, if it were not for the obvious, which is sadly that our people's work ethic, education, attitude etc etc etc is garbage.

YOU WANT TO STOP THE FOREIGNERS FROM TAKING YOUR JOBS, FIX YOURSELVES, DONT LOOK FOR LEGISLATION TO PROTECT YOU. FIX YOUR OWN DEAD ASS, AND MAKE YOURSELF WORTH HIRING!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

OOPS, I guess I just addressed the hiring foreigner worker issue honestly!

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ThisIsOurs 6 days, 15 hours ago

You overlooked the fact that countries that succeed have deliberate strategies to fix the educational shortfalls of the dead asses in their society to make the country competitive. For forty years our governments have had a deliberate political strategy to keep people uneducated. They need people looking for handouts in exchange for votes. Telling people go fix yourself is not the way for the government to go,it's nice for those who can,but the governments role is to make a way. This bill will do the reverse. No expat will willingly put themselves out of a job by training their replacement.

Your Bahamians too dumb and stupid and rude so hire foreigners will eventually lead to sorrow. You can't take land jobs and opportunity away from you native population and expect good things to happen. Addressing the problem is addressing the education in an intentional way

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Chucky 6 days, 12 hours ago

The fact that there are few examples of people who successfully make it through the educational system, go on from there to get university degrees shows that the system is possible to navigate if there is a will to do so.

sadly, it takes a parent who cares, and a kid who tries! Obviously few and far between in our country.

Aside from that, any employee who is willing to try, work hard and learn will move forward, regardless of education. But again employees like that are few and far between,

Any way you slice it, our people are lousy.

Ever notice how hard work can pay off, how trying can make a difference, apparently to our Bahamians, it's not something worth doing; not if they can scam there way through!

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