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Federation Mourning Loss Of Golfer 'Zorro'

By BRENT STUBBS

Senior Sports Reporter

bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

THE Bahamas Golf Federation is mourning the loss of one of its most prolific golfers.

Prince 'Zorro' Stubbs, who has represented the Bahamas on just about every national team that has left the country, passed away at Princess Margaret Hospital on Christmas Eve.

He was 80.

Condolences poured in from various members of the golfing community where he left an indelible mark.

Jim Duncombe, his long-time fishing buddy, spent a lot of time travelling with Stubbs as a coach of the national teams when they travelled to the Caribbean Amateur Golf Championships.

"It's a great loss to the golfing community. He's done a lot for the golfing community in the Bahamas. We are all going to miss him," Duncombe said.

"He didn't let no-one know when he was going. We didn't expect him to go so soon. But that's a part of life. We all have to go. I guess it was part of life. That was his number."

Over the years, Duncombe said he had the opportunity to travel with Stubbs throughout the Caribbean and one of his fondest memories came in a trip to Puerto Rico where Stubbs teamed up with Harcourt 'Coins' Poitier on the senior team.

"There was a par-three close to about 270 yards and he chipped the ball in the hole," Duncombe remembered. "Everybody just gone crazy. He was that type of golfer."

Not only was he a great golfer, but Duncombe said Stubbs spent a lot of time trying to assist a lot of golfers to develop their game.

BGF president Glen Archer said Stubbs was a prolific national team member and one of the players in the forefront to put the Bahamas on the map as a force to reckon with in the CAGA in the 1960-70s.

"I guess we will miss him because he was truly a Bahamian golf ambassador," Archer said.

"Whenever you talked about golf in the Caribbean, you would always hear the name Prince 'Zorro' Stubbs. "In many competitions, he teamed up with Coins Poitier in competition. But he was also known as a great cricketer as well. One thing about him was that he didn't like to lose. He always aspired to win and he tried to get the people around him to do the same."

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