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Solar Power Plan For Abaco Water

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WSC executive chairman Adrian Gibson.

By LEANDRA ROLLE

lrolle@tribunemedia.net

THE Water and Sewerage Corporation, in partnership with several international groups, yesterday launched its Abaco Sunny Waters project, which aims to solarise and transform Abaco's damaged water systems in the aftermath of Hurricane Dorian.

The $1.2m initiative will result in the installation a state-of-the-art solar facility that will power water well-fields and pumping stations in the Marsh Harbour area, which is expected to be completed in four months.

Other objectives include the solarisation of Abaco's water sanitation system and the implementation of a school-outreach programme to increase interest in science, which will be conducted in later phases.

Speaking at yesterday's launch and agreement signing, WSC Executive Chairman Adrian Gibson expressed gratitude to the United Nations Children Fund (UNICEF), Water Mission and The Goodness Tour and other non-profit organisations for their willingness to collaborate with WSC to better transform Abaco's water and sewerage system.

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Local children performing song and dance at the Abaco Sunny Waters agreement signing and project launch in Marsh Harbour. Photo: Shawn Hanna/Tribune Staff

"You are all friends and this is all done in the spirit of friendship and collaboration and we are grateful to have you. Today is a red letter day .. (and) we are fully supportive of these initiatives and we will be closely monitoring their progress," he added.

During his address, he also noted the initiative is a part of the water corporation's ongoing efforts to build more resilient and climate proof water systems in Abaco.

"We are getting up and building stronger and better than before…. The focus of all our rebuilding efforts is to design and construct climate resilient systems and facilities that could withstand future major storms. (Because) it is inevitable with climate change that we will at some point have another storm," he said.

"So, these tanks will be much stronger and will be more resilient."

To date, Mr Gibson added that contracts in excess of $6m have already been issued to help with the rebuilding process in Abaco.

"The corporation has already awarded a contract for a new 1.5m imperial gallon storage tank for this pumping station where we stand today to replace the two existing storage tanks that suffered intensive damage (from Dorian)," he said.

"That contract includes a new 750,000 imperial gallon tank in Treasure Cay and also 125,000 imperial gallon tank for Grand Cay and repairs to the existing Green Turtle Cay storage tank. All of these new tanks are rated for wind bloating in excess of 200 miles per hour."

He continued: "Contracts have also been awarded for new distribution pumps to this pumping station here (in Marsh Harbour) and the corporation is actively working with various NGOs to ensure that new stand-by generators for this pumping station and all the other stations in Abaco are obtained.

"Contract drawings are (also) being finalised for a new pumping station for this compound and we hope to award that contract along with a contract for a new commercial facility for Treasure Cay and other building works in short order."

Discussions for similar projects in other communities in Abaco are currently being carried out, according to the Long Island MP.

Comments

Chucky 3 months, 3 weeks ago

Idiots, solar panels to generate power to pump crap ground water.

Why not use solar desalination which generates clean water and power at the same time.

Photo voltaic is worst and most inefficient form of solar usage. Anyone pushing this is doing for quick cash grab.

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The_Oracle 3 months, 3 weeks ago

"That contract includes a new $750,000 imperial gallon tank in Treasure Cay and also $125,000 imperial gallon tank for Grand Cay"

Imperial Dollars or Imperial Gallons? Good grief. If dollars how many gallons? If gallons how many dollars?

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Goose242 2 months, 2 weeks ago

This is good news for Abaco and the greater Bahamas! However, what is sad about this story is this:

Shortly after #HurricaneDorian devastated Abaco and grand Bahama, a particular local(100% Bahamian owned) company located in New Providence, met with some WSC engineers, NEMA officials, and other stakeholders, respectively – to propose this EXACT solution for Abaco, Grand Bahama, and The Family Islands – to rebuild WSC infrastructure, and improve water security and resilience throughout The Bahamas against natural disaster, utility load shedding, etc.

Sadly, the aforementioned local company(that specializes in solar-powered water pumping systems) also provided strategies to WSC engineers, and NEMA officials for:

1) assessing damaged site locations 2)strategies for seeking funding from select NGOs(UN, Samaritan’s Purse, World Bank, etc.) who were already deployed in Abaco 3) provided literature of the proposed water pump/s solutions to integrate with solar systems, generator, utility.

Sadly, the only thing (those) WSC engineers, NEMA officials and other stakeholders who engaged in numerous emails with the aforementioned (local) company did was(other than offering an opportunity to install/procure/consult/contract) was:

1) send a long list requesting hundreds of needed pumps(for free) 2) use the same strategies to acquire NGO funding 3) use the same strategies for selecting sites and performing analysis 4) act like the WSC team came up with this revolutionary idea, etc.

So basically…one must question(again), Why local expertise and entrepreneurship continues to be overlooked, pushed aside, ignored by supposedly select groups/persons who are keen on improving his/her own ego, social status, money, and God knows whatever else?

Are Bahamians with the technical and engineering expertise going to play integral roles in ‘rebuilding our Bahamas’ or will be always considered ‘non-expert-enough’ or ‘not financially wealthy enough’ to participate in some arenas?

Hmm…as I ponder like many other entrepreneurs…lol

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Goose242 2 months, 2 weeks ago

This is good news for Abaco and the greater Bahamas! However, what is sad about this story is this: Shortly after #HurricaneDorian devastated Abaco and grand Bahama, a particular local(100% Bahamian owned) company located in New Providence, met with some WSC engineers, NEMA officials, and other stakeholders, respectively – to propose this EXACT solution for Abaco, Grand Bahama, and The Family Islands – to rebuild WSC infrastructure, and improve water security and resilience throughout The Bahamas against natural disaster, utility load shedding, etc. Sadly, the aforementioned local company(that specializes in solar-powered water pumping systems) also provided strategies to WSC engineers, and NEMA officials for: 1) assessing damaged site locations 2)strategies for seeking funding from select NGOs(UN, Samaritan’s Purse, World Bank, etc.) who were already deployed in Abaco 3) provided literature of the proposed water pump/s solutions to integrate with solar systems, generator, utility. Sadly, the only thing (those) WSC engineers, NEMA officials and other stakeholders who engaged in numerous emails with the aforementioned (local) company did was(other than offering an opportunity to install/procure/consult/contract) was: 1) send a long list requesting hundreds of needed pumps(for free) 2) use the same strategies to acquire NGO funding 3) use the same strategies for selecting sites and performing analysis 4) act like the WSC team came up with this revolutionary idea, etc. So basically…one must question(again), Why local expertise and entrepreneurship continues to be overlooked, pushed aside, ignored by supposedly select groups/persons who are keen on improving his/her own ego, social status, money, and God knows whatever else? Are Bahamians with the technical and engineering expertise going to play integral roles in ‘rebuilding our Bahamas’ or will be always considered ‘non-expert-enough’ or ‘not financially wealthy enough’ to participate in some arenas? Hmm…as I ponder like many other entrepreneurs…lol

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