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Disaster Reconstruction Authority Dismisses 'Fake News' Over Quality Of Domes

A model of the Family Relief Centre’s dome structure that will include plumbing, drainage, a sewer system, and electricity. Photos: Shawn Hanna/Tribune Staff

A model of the Family Relief Centre’s dome structure that will include plumbing, drainage, a sewer system, and electricity. Photos: Shawn Hanna/Tribune Staff

THE Disaster Reconstruction Authority has defended the integrity of the domes it has purchased to temporarily house storm victims, calling social media posts criticising their quality “fake news”.

“On Friday, January 24, 2020, a fake news story circulated on social media stating that the real cost of the domes is $900 per unit,” the DRA said. “This fake news post suggested the authority overspent or misinformed the public on the real dome cost.

“This social media post is false and extremely misleading. The cheap domes for $900 referred to in the fake news social media post are of significantly lower quality than the domes purchased by the authority.

“It is unclear if the cheap domes were tested for quality at international standards. It is also unclear what materials were used in their construction. It is irresponsible of anyone to suggest the authority should purchase cheap, untested domes that cannot stand up to the conditions in our country.

“The authority advises Bahamians to get their news and information from responsible news sources. There is a large amount of fake news circulating created by uniformed people,” the DRA noted.

Domes are under construction in Spring City, Abaco. The DRA has budgeted $6.4 million for the domes; an estimated $4 million has been committed to cost.

This $4 million cost includes the purchase of 250 domes; the preparation of the land for the domes; the purchase of equipment related to the installation; the installation of infrastructure for the domes; and operation of the family relief centre, the DRA noted.

The DRA said the InterShelter domes its purchased have been structurally and field tested – the field testing being over 30 years; and the domes are designed to withstand hurricane-force winds of 200-plus miles per hour.

The domes have been used around the world and by the US Army, Navy, Marines and Air Force and are reusable after the their initial use.

The temporary domes are free of charge to those displaced by Hurricane Dorian. Information regarding applications for the domes will be issued in the near future, the DRA said.

Comments

Sickened 6 months, 2 weeks ago

We may need to use some of these domes as quarantine rooms if this Coronavirus ends up here and overwhelms our already overwhelmed hospitals and clinics.

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Observer 6 months, 2 weeks ago

How much did Government pay for each dome?

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ThisIsOurs 6 months, 2 weeks ago

Are they igloos? Were they designed for tropical climates. Just wondering, they look like igloos. They look like the outpost stations used by scientists in the north pole. But if you're in a strong hurricane and they stand up to the wind the survivors wont care

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The_Oracle 6 months, 2 weeks ago

Not going to stand up to Hurricane winds screwed to wooden decks! I wonder, if one were to divide the moneys received, (and spent on this folly for a Temp housing solution) were instead divided equally between each bona Fide damaged household for repair and rebuilding BY THOSE HOMEOWNERS, even if in Abaco alone, how much faster rebuilding might occur? Mind, then we wouldn't need a Minister of Disaster or a full blown Ministry.

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Chucky 6 months, 2 weeks ago

Seems the government just got caught in a scam, but deny deny deny and all is business as usual!

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Dawes 6 months, 2 weeks ago

It would be fitting to call these domes Minnis Town, that way if they are as good as they say it he would be proud to have his name associated with it. But if they are as bad as some say then he will always be associated with them.

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My2centz 6 months, 2 weeks ago

While these domes may divert hurricane force winds due to its round shape, it will not withstand flooding. And they also look ridiculous. If the government was that comfortable spending so much money it should have been on permanent solutions such as prefab metal structures, or other prefab buildings that can be built on pilings.

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DWW 6 months, 2 weeks ago

they leak. and they will leak continually forever. well maybe not while a tarp is on top but the bolts will wear holes in the tarps and then leak. i guess you could put Grace over it and that would keep them water tight for a few months. they are fibreglass panels bolted together every 8 or 10 inches. every single bolt hole will leak. and they have no ventilation.

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ThisIsOurs 6 months, 2 weeks ago

hmmm..It doesn't rain in the north pole and they don't have mosquitoes! ... I find this fascinating and I'm not being sarcastic. It's amazing the things you need to think about as you move a solution intended for one environment to another (we saw this with clickToClear just a few weeks ago...worked perfectly in its native environment but a few adjustments needed to get to a stable implementation here).... that's "if" they do in fact leak

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Bahamianbychoice 6 months, 2 weeks ago

I would also like to know the cost per dome. The amounts in the article are broad based and I believe also misleading.

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