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Education Director Blames School Brawls On 'Poorly Socialised' Students

Lionel Sands

Lionel Sands

photo

The damaged ear of a teenage girl caught up in a fight at CV Bethel.

By NICO SCAVELLA

Tribune Staff Reporter

nscavella@tribunemedia.net

THE recent wave of high school brawls were the result of “poorly socialised” high school students, Education Director Lionel Sands said yesterday, adding that there is “very little” the Ministry of Education can do to prevent such incidences from occurring in the future.

Speaking to The Tribune after documented fights in several government high schools, most notably C V Bethel Senior High, Mr Sands called the brawls a “vexing” issue for the ministry and high school educators. He said it was “difficult to get to the root” of the cause of the fights, as he said most, if not all, of the fights took place after school hours.

However, he stressed that the fights are not incidents that are “perpetuated” by the respective schools. On Wednesday, four teenage girls from C V Bethel were taken into police custody for participating in a brawl that sent two other students, both girls, to the Princess Margaret Hospital.

The girls, aged 14 to 16, were arrested during a fight that involved dozens of female students from C V Bethel. Two teenagers were subsequently taken to hospital for treatment and one girl had a portion of her ear bitten off during the fight, according to officer-in-charge of the East Street South Police Station, Superintendent Craig Stubbs. That fight was one of three government high school fights that were recorded and circulated widely on social media earlier this week.

“It’s very little you can do about that, because the incidences that happened actually for the most part happened after school away from the school, so there’s very little that can be done,” Mr Sands told The Tribune. “For the most part our kids are not socialised. They are poorly socialised, and that has to happen in the first instance in the home where they become socialised, and understand that they have a responsibility to themselves and a responsibility to everybody else, so that they would act in a certain way.

“But that is taught at home first. And once it is taught at home it is supplemented by what is taught at school. We don’t have that unfortunately, where kids are being socialised at home in the first instance. And so the job of teaching becomes more and more difficult, because in order for the job to be effective, the kids must come to the classroom in the first instance socialised.”

In the two-minute video, dozens of teenage girls still dressed in their C V Bethel uniforms, could be seen attacking each other in the middle of East Street South, directly in front of the police station. At one point, officers attempted to stop the fight, but the girls overpowered them. Students were also seen throwing blue paint in the middle of the road, bringing traffic to a standstill.

In another video, dozens of female students from the C R Walker Senior High School were recorded while fighting on Blue Hill Road north near the St Agnes Anglican Church. At first, it appeared to be dozens of female students fighting indiscriminately. However, it developed into a situation that saw three female students ganging up on a lone female student. It then shifted to a one-on-one fight after another female student began striking the lone female student fiercely with a large piece of wood.

The fight concluded in front of Sweeting’s Colonial Mortuary Crematorium, where male C R Walker students, along with an adult female, helped to quell the situation.

Two other videos circulating showed students brawling at Anatol Rodgers High School and at Eight Mile Rock High School in Grand Bahama.

All this, notwithstanding the shooting of a security guard - multiple times - by a gunman dressed in a school uniform at L W Young Junior High School on Bernard Road around midday on Tuesday.

Officer-in-charge of the Central Detective Unit Chief Superintendent Paul Rolle said while the gunman appeared to be dressed in a C I Gibson school uniform, police could not confirm if he was actually a student. On Friday, however, police arrested a 17-year-old boy in connection with the shooting.

“It’s a vexing problem for the schools and also for the community,” Mr Sands said. “For the country it’s a vexing problem. We can’t continue to have those things happening because we are destroying ourselves in doing that. It is disturbing, yes, but it is not something that is perpetuated by the school, that’s the bottom line. But they happen. You’re disturbed by it, you do your best to ensure that they don’t happen, particularly while the kids are at school.

“But once the kids leave the confines of the school there is very little the principal or the ministry can do because we have control of those children between the hours of nine to three when they come into our gates and when they leave the gate. So it’s a challenge we are having.”

Mr Sands added that Education Minister Jerome Fitzgerald is also bothered by the recent brawls. “He is disappointed, as we all are,” Mr Sands said. “We’re disappointed that the kids do the things that they do, because it makes it seem as if what we are doing in the school is not sufficient, but it’s not really that.

“If the kids were confined to us 24 hours a day when they should be at home, that’s a different thing. But they come to us and they leave us. So what happens between us and where they come from, we don’t know. We do know that our community needs help, help from all around. So the school alone isn’t going to cut it.”

Comments

Well_mudda_take_sic 2 years, 5 months ago

The failed economic and social policies of the PLP and FNM alike have turned our public schools into breeding grounds for social misfits, many of whom are destined to become hard core criminals when they later come to the realization that their government has left them uneducated and without jobs. Pindling, Ingraham and Christie have all sown the seeds of discontentment and despair for most of our country's youth and it's only a matter of time now before we find ourselves confronted with civil unrest on a massive scale in the form of uncontrollable wide spread rioting and looting. Our despot PM, Christie, certainly sent the wrong message to our youth when he and the PLP decided to take money from the numbers' bosses like Flowers and Bastian in exchange for legalizing their criminal racketeering activities. Looking at the damaged ear photo above, Christie had better be careful with those big pointed ears of his whenever on public school grounds.

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Cobalt 2 years, 5 months ago

I usually agree with most of what you express in your post. You are one of a few persons that actually write anything with substance or sense on this website.

However, I think that some of your argument should be reassessed. A decent education is available to all students residing in the Bahamas if they want it! We live in an age where knowledge is at our fingertips. If someone wants an education, all that person need do is pick up a book and study its contents! The problem is...... our students are not interested in education! And the MAIN reason is because the value of a good education is not taught, or enforced in the HOMES! The HOMES are the problem!!! Here in the Bahamas we've got a perpetual cycle of bad parenting, bad decision making, and poor morals being exercised. Young woman continue to have children that they know they can't nurture nor support.... so they pass their burden on to the state! The HOMES have become the breeding ground for much of our social ills! Parents are not teaching their children social skills or conflict resolution skills!! All they preach is the pursuit of money, but are not teaching their children how to exercise their brains to achieve personal success. While both governments must shoulder their portion of blame, so must the citizens of the Bahamas. You cannot operate a dis functional home and then place the backlash on the government!

I am by no means attempting to vindicate the government! I could actually write a book on their colossal failures and the massive negative affect that it's having on the citizens of the Bahamas. But when a child or a group of students become disruptive and destructive especially at school...... that's a problem associated with the home!

(If poverty was responsible for crime... then that means that the generation before us including our grand parents and great grand parents should have been career criminals.... seeing that they were the epitome of poverty and hardship. But they weren't criminals! Because they had good morals, a sound home, and believed in hard work!)

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Well_mudda_take_sic 2 years, 5 months ago

I couldn't agree with you more about the impact of the dysfunctional homes in which many of our youth live today. We have many fathers who can't find decent paying jobs, many broken marriages leaving a single parent to feed, clothe and nurture their children while working two and sometimes three low paying jobs each day, immediate and extended family members in the same predicament and therefore unable to assist in any way, etc. etc. Home is simply no longer home as it was in the days of our poor grandparents and even poorer great grandparents. There is no one at home anymore to teach moral values and to serve as mentors for our youth. This is the root symptom or the very essence of the failed social and economic policies of our successive governments over the last four decades. Parents with decent paying jobs and careers are more likely to stay married, spend more time at home with their children and take great pride and joy in seeing to it that their children are well reared with core values that will serve them well in life. These basic facts are certainly irrefutable.

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killemwitdakno 2 years, 5 months ago

School is the only escape for kids from those homes. The influence should then be the other way around. That's what our taxes pay for. Social improvement. Starting with education which breaks the cycle.

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duppyVAT 2 years, 5 months ago

Just two points: Fitzgerald had very little to say in how he is going to fix the poor urban schools beyond putting the "bad kids" in the old BA facility .......... and Lionel Sands needs to go home

CV Bethel was the top public urban school ........... they broke up the leadership team and look at what happened now .............. if it was not broke, dont fix it.

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Cobalt 2 years, 5 months ago

In the past, people have often been quick to criticize teachers for our failing students. Every time something went wrong in the school system, fingers were pointed at the teachers.

Now (thanks to this incident) readers can get a glimpse into the daily obstacles faced by our educators. In the Bahamas teachers are expected to carry out the "energy consuming" task of educating and grading thousands of our students. In the midst of these duties, they're contested by rude, ill mannered, disruptive children, stemming from dysfunctional homes. As a result, more time is spent disciplining and pacifying rather than learning and testing. The average teacher is now expected to grade and educated 34+ students per day! Can you imagine trying to accomplish this task amongst such an unruly bunch of children? This is savagery at its best (students fighting and biting like wild dogs).

While Im sure that there are some teaches out there that don't quite fit the mold; I think that we don't give our teaches enough credit sometimes. The parents of these children (especially the fathers) need a swift kick in their back-side for failing to nurture these children in the ways of the Lord!! And the government also needs a swift kick in their hip for not promoting education and enhancing the rewards associated with the pursuit of knowledge! And then they go out and outsource mega billion dollar contracts with foreigners because they claim that Bahamians are unqualified! The government of the Bahamas has mentally enslaved Bahamians and Bahamians won't wake up!! We're too busy dancing in the streets.

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Honestman 2 years, 5 months ago

A big part of the problem is the poor attitude to marriage / commitment by both Bahamian men and women. How many Bahamian men enter into marriage with the serious intention that it is to be a life time commitment and a bedrock for the children to come? Argue with me if you think I am wrong but how many men marry with the intention to take a mistress whenever the romance cools off? How many Bahamian women encourage this infidelity for their "thirty pieces of silver:? Until Bahamians substitute lust for genuine commitment then we will continue to harvest young feral teenagers with no sense of right or wrong and no understanding of the value of education. My heart goes out to every teacher in the public school system - many of these brave and committed souls should be the recipient of the country's highest awards.

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Alltoomuch 2 years, 5 months ago

There is just so much truth in these statements; specially the bit about preferring foreigners. - Dancing in the streets & legalising webshops when so much else needs to be done for our suffering children.. and so little is being done.. Totally heartbreaking to see whole generations of children leaving school with no hope in sight! Year after year..... no doubt more promises to come....

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duppyVAT 2 years, 5 months ago

We have seven senior high schools in Nassau ................ one should be a classic grammar school (the old GHS) ........ three should be trade schools........ one should be an arts/music school ........ one should be a hospitality school .............. and one should be a STEM school. That is what Fitzie should be doing to improve our public school system instead of keeping these lousy one-size-fits-all dumps ...................... you go to the school that your talents/skills are best suited for after doing BJC not some school just because it is near to you

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Cobalt 2 years, 5 months ago

No disrespect..... but that is not a good idea.

First of all, the options that you've mentioned don't even begin to encompass the diverse interest that contemporary students may have. What happens to students who aren't interested in any of the above mentioned careers? We have trained professionals in these areas already who can't find consistent employment. Second of all... seven high schools wont be capable of accommodating such a large concentration of students. Many of those schools require extensive renovations as it is. Thirdly, and more importantly..... what you are suggesting are called Vocational Schools. They are meant for students who have acquired the preliminary and fundamental academic requirements needed to continue their education. A fundamental education begins in kindergarten and ends in grade's 11 or 12. During these years, students acquire the basic academic and social skills needed to compete and survive in the world.

What you are suggesting is that we send our students to Vocational Institutes before they have successfully completed a course in basic education. I don't think that would work very well for our students. Students need to master the basics if they're going to be successful in the real world.

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killemwitdakno 2 years, 5 months ago

Wooooow, what a mindset to have about the children.. I hope you're not in the field. They are talented. There is an annoying informational gap between this generation and the cronies who set regulations.

Check out Duke Ellington and more examples. All intended for inner city kids who make a cut. There are Vocational schools for say mechanic trade, Art schools for creatives, Tech schools for basic skills, Magnet schools/programs for those interested in certain field early, ie business. STEM schools for advanced science and maths, School is a place to LEARN. Sounds like these professionals don't get refreshed training. Try a trade show please. Fundamental ends at grade 3, reading , writing, arithmetic , and respect, all you need to prove your willing to set a path for yourself and be accepted somewhere. If teachers aren't meeting the basics by the time they reach fractions in 4th grade, that's a problem.

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Cobalt 2 years, 5 months ago

I'm having difficulty understanding your argument. My point is simply that a basic education (K - 12) is a fundamental necessity for all. No matter your walk in life, in today's world, graduating high school is a fundamental, basic necessity that most people should have, if not everyone. Of coarse history does have many examples of individuals who have accomplished success without and education. But I assure you that it's a small percentage when compared with the obvious. Statistics have proven that a high school education is pivotal for personal success. That can't be argued.

And did you really just say that a fundemental education ends at grade 3??? WOW. Not only is that utter rubbish, but you've just told the entire Bahamas (and the world) that you don't possess a high school education. Only someone who never graduated high school would make an ignorant statement such as that. I pray that you're not a Bahamian nor a parent of school-age children. Because it's people like you and yours that contributes to the D (really an F) average.

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duppyVAT 2 years, 5 months ago

If you think the present National HighSchool Diploma idea that caters to a ninth grade level education for high school graduates is the answer ....... I am sorry for us .......... that is Fitzgerald's idea. while his children and their friends go to elitist private schools that do IB and AP programmes

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B_I_D___ 2 years, 5 months ago

Deadbeat fathers(if you can even call them fathers) and slack tramp mothers...enough said...

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banker 2 years, 5 months ago

Perfectly and eloquently said. That is the problem. Children having children.

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Bahamianpride 2 years, 5 months ago

Unfortunately we have come to the point in our educational system where consideration has to be given to segregating the problem kids from the productive ones. Special Charter schools need to be created either through a combination of public and private funding to save the kids who are their to learn from the poorly socialized predators. Otherwise we take a risk of losing generations of kids who will receive no education and add to our social problems. No education can occur under the threat of violence or constant behavioral disruptions.

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Alltoomuch 2 years, 5 months ago

Sad to say, Bahamianpride, but I think your last few sentences have already been reached.

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EasternGate 2 years, 5 months ago

All of the above are excellent critiques of dysfunctional educational system and social environment. I only wish this page could be debated in Parliament. Unfortunately, even though we can attempt to bolt the gates, the horses are long gone. WHAT I SEE ENVOLVING IN THE BAHAMAS IS ANOTHER SPECIES. They look like us, talk somewhat like us... but that is where the similarities end!

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duppyVAT 2 years, 5 months ago

Well ............. Pindling thought he was doing us a favour by getting rid of the old GHS ....... all he created was generalist high schools that did very little to channel the labour force needs since 1967. We still depend on about five elitist grammar PRIVATE schools to produce our best students ............ the same thing that Pindling destroyed in the public system

While we try everything from US, UK, Finland, Japan and Singapore ......... we have to create a system that can cater to the local Bahamian environment that is not like any of the others tat we wish to copy

Cobalt ......................... wats your solution????????? ........... status quo??????????

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Cobalt 2 years, 5 months ago

Any solution to the public school system is complex, to say the least. First of all, because of an illegal immigration crisis, the school system is over populated. To my surprise, this is a problem that Minister Fred Mitchell is trying to combat amidst strong opposition! Children belonging to illegal parents must not be allowed to burden the school system any longer! Our national treasury cannot sustain Haiti and its also impeding the learning curb of Bahamian students! Secondly, I suggest that the education curriculum be substantially modified to meet the changing demands of the world. These changes should occur mainly between grade's 6 - 12. From grades K - 5 schools should use the Harcourt curriculum which has proven successful at initiating basic reading, comprehension, and arithmetic skills. With a decrease in the school's populace, a good academic foundation can be reasonably established. Students who are in middle school (grades 6-8) junior high school (grades 9-10) and high school (grades 11-12) should be conducting preliminary academic coarse-work consistent with the global standard of education. Whether its the GCE examination for students attempting to study in London, Canada, or the Caribbean...or whether it's the ACT examination for students attempting to study in the United States, my argument is simply this... at least 65% of our students graduating high school should be capable of passing global standardized test! This should be the goal of our education system! Simply because this is the GLOBAL standard! In other words, 1+1= 2 no matter where you are in the world! Knowledge and scientific law are not contingent upon our global positioning. It remains consistent no matter where you are on the planet. So why isn't the Bahamas operating under the global standard?? Especially when most of what we consume on a daily basis is manufactured using scientific (chemical & physical) laws and principles! Although it may be years from now, we also need a local Bahamian University (graduate school included) operating under the global standard designed to initiate the interest of our brightest minds, while conducting knowledge and testing that will propel the Bahamas into the 21st century. As I work throughout various hospitals, I realize that much of the hardware including diagnostic machines, chemical reagents, software, and various forms of medications can be synthesized right here in the Bahamas if we import only the raw products. This would not only create a job market, but also cut spending. But the problem resides in the fact that science and technology are both complex areas of study, and the foundation for such has not being established by either government nor the people. It really vexes me to hear the Ministry of Education attach "science and technology" to their title...especially since the government cannot boast of one publicly funded government scientist!! Not a damn one!!

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Jonahbay 2 years, 5 months ago

I agree with many of your points, however a Harcourt Curriculum is not the answer. This is not rocket science, the foundations of literacy and numeracy can be taught using a Bahamiancentric curriculum. What we lack are resources. What we have in abundance are overcrowded classrooms full of children who can learn if reached. We need more innovative and engaging programming. We also need social programs that ensure children are not hungry and can focus on what is being taught. This complex issue is something that has to be dealt with or there is certain death for the future Bahamas.

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Cobalt 2 years, 5 months ago

Oh, I'm not saying that Harcourt is the answer (by no means). What I'm suggesting is that some of our education curriculum be modified in order to familiarize our students with the global standard of education.

The glogal standard of education is extremely important because it is a proven, systematic, qualitative approach that serves as a catalyst in familiarizing students with the physical laws that conduct the natural world. It also aids in helping students to broaden their view and understanding of the world.

We live in an age where I believe that a college education, or a lucrative trade/skill is a must if one wishes to survive. Both require critical thinking abilities and a fundamental education. In the last three decades the world has drastically evolved. Likewise, we must evolve. For example, we used typewriters when I was in school. Today... students operating under the global standard are utilizing keyboarding skills, PowerPoint and Excel. Some students in other countries are even experimenting with writing software programs (while in high school). They are being taught and trained at an early age that most of the world depends upon computer software. Where are our computer software engineers??? It seems that after acquiring their private school education, they go to college where they excel and then they never come back to the Bahamas. I guarantee you that private schools in the Bahamas don't use the public school's curriculum. As a matter of fact, both QC, St Andrews and SAC prepare their seniors to sit ACT and GCE exams. The government needs to step up the public schools education curriculum. The world is changing. We need to keep up. That's all I was trying to say.

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Cobalt 2 years, 5 months ago

I have many practical solutions that can work in which I could share with you. But unfortunately this website only allows its readers 3000 characters.

It's time for Bahamians to cut ties with antiquated ideals, ideas, and practices of successive governments! We the people must hand select our future leaders! Men and women who are honest, committed, and possess know-how in order to turn our school system around. And we the parents must do our part aswell.

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duppyVAT 2 years, 5 months ago

What have we learned from the FOUR studies undertaken by the government since Ivy Dumont was Minister of Education ............. at least she tried to reform some things.

Fitzie will be hosting the British Commonwealth Ministers of Education next week ......... and what will he have to brag about public education in The Bahamas??????? .......... or will he lie and cover up and hide behind the private schools where all of his friends children go, get all the good results, get all of the scholarships and leave the country and never come back... .. great system huhhhhhh????????????

We cant wait to listen to his lying, ducking, jiving gangster azzzzzzzzzzzz hollow speeches

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killemwitdakno 2 years, 5 months ago

You're right about never coming back. America is too glad to keep them.

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ohdrap4 2 years, 5 months ago

......... and what will he have to brag about public education in The Bahamas??????? ..

That they have perfected the art of engaging a majority of foreign teachers from poorer countries of the caribbean (who will work for peanuts) so they don't have to pay them any retirement? these folks also will accept those classes with 40+ students.

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Jonahbay 2 years, 5 months ago

The fact remains that in The Bahamas mediocrity is prized. Lionel Sands needs to go, and anyone else who is high up in the Ministry of Education who have no new ideas for the country and continue to practice this insanity. Throw up your hands and blame someone else! That is the way we like it in The Bahamas. Education Reform is a dirty word in this country. For over a decade we have had the same abysmal results and the same people running the show. No new ideas, no desperate attempts to save the nation's youth. For some myopic reason this is not a priority for any government, we are in a bad place and it's only going to get worse if there is no revolution of thought.

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killemwitdakno 2 years, 5 months ago

Sounds like Tribune had themselves a time watching the recording. What is this report, Mayweather vs Pacquiao?

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killemwitdakno 2 years, 5 months ago

Their union monies need to then go to SOCIALIZING STUDENTS. Fire him.

The boys promote and cheer on these things. All them at the scene need to do community service hours and detention. I hope that barbarian just lost her police record of good standing. Nottage put two girls in prison overnight for talking back, this brute better be on his next show.

All the barbaric culture they're bringing in, with no sophisticated or artsy exposure alongside. Teach self respect and some worthiness. Girls are going down the drain.

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Alltoomuch 2 years, 5 months ago

A few years back we went to visit Dominica - a very small country - took a short bus tour - the guide was full of their educational successes - over 90% of their students leaving the school system with very high academic standards... we can't even begin to come close to that! what impressed me most was the fact that the guide thought this really was something to be proud of. Do we have any pride left in anything?

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B_I_D___ 2 years, 5 months ago

...about 90% of our public school students failing even basic grade level work...but somehow come out with a completion certificate...

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duppyVAT 2 years, 5 months ago

If you think the present National High School Diploma idea that caters to a ninth grade level education for high school graduates is the answer ....... I am sorry for us .......... that is Fitzgerald's idea. .................while his children and their friends go to elitist private schools that do IB and AP programmes

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duppyVAT 2 years, 5 months ago

Privatize all the failing Junior and Senior high schools (based on external exam resuls) and let them be chartered and cater to one of four areas ........... STEM, arts, hospitality or trades ........... Allow principals/school boards to recruit their own staffs ........... fire teachers who are not willing to improve beyond an average rating after three years ........... and institute a Teachers Service Commission to deal with the teaching profession within the Government ............ this is where we need to go in the Bahamas ....... who will lead us?????

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banker 2 years, 5 months ago

It doesn't help that most of the teachers can't speak the Queen's English. They are underpaid. They are not given the proper resources. Their is a culture of slackness throughout the Bahamas. We put up with non-functioning traffic lights, slack government departments that take 12 weeks for a passport, having a baby with the new police officer in the Family Islands to grease the wheels, electing crooks like Shame Gibson back into Parliament, ... I could go on and on. The Prime Minister is a lying slack-mouth and so how do you expect anyone else to be something less than slack if all that the daily life demonstrates is that slackness is the status quo. Jesus Christ is not worshipped -- it is mediocrity that is.

Have you seen the social media pictures of prom? One is even arriving in an ambulance. You have these kids in costumes costing hundreds of dollars and not one in ten could tell you what is the answer to 11 times 12 minus 32.

Poorly socialised is a misnomer. They are unfit for anything except Bahamian society at the present. I'm willing to bet that if you had a metal detector, there would be more than one handgun in the prom cummerbund.

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Reality_Check 2 years, 5 months ago

The point of no return for our country was reached in the mid to late 1970s, when Pindling realized it was much easier for him to remain in power with an expanded "dumbed down" electorate. By this time, even the more easily manipulated and misguided youth within certain of our private schools, like Queen's College, were busy painting highly qualified and devoted foreign educators as "white" detractors from the ability of Bahamians to develop their own cultural values and identity. Back then, Pindling fully recognized the importance of recruiting senior students within the private schools, like Sean McWeeney, to support his "dumbing down" policy by agitating for the rapid and pre-mature Bahamianization of the teaching profession at all levels. Shortly thereafter came the willingness of Loftus Roker to act on Pindling's "dumbing down" policy by pulling the work permits of many foreign teachers overnight. This was soon followed by a series of sweeping social policies introduced by Pindling that effectively opened the doors of our country to a massive influx of uneducated and unskilled illegal immigrants (mainly Haitians) who could easily be persuaded to swear allegiance to the PLP in exchange for the grant of Bahamian citizenship and their vote for the PLP candidate. The rest is history and we are where we are today.....well beyond the point of no return. You only have to observe the average type of politician our "dumbed down" electorate now votes for to appreciate where Pindling's "dumbing down" and "welcoming of illegal immigrant" policies, as continued by Ingraham and Christie, have taken us. My advice to those older indigenous Bahamians who will still be in the Bahamas a decade or so from now: Do your best to learn to speak Creole and pray you do not become a victim of the senseless crimes perpetrated daily by many of the "dumbed down" who now live all around us!

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duppyVAT 2 years, 5 months ago

There are very few illegal immigrant students in our schools ........... Creole will never be our second/national language ............. we are not "dumbed down", we accept and manipulate the political culture that we have inherited from the British

CHANGE WILL COME IN THE NEXT BAHAMIAN GENERATION ....... THOSE U30

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banker 2 years, 5 months ago

we are not "dumbed down", we accept and manipulate the political culture that we have inherited from the British

If that were true, then you have to look at the Cayman Islands. Caymanis have a standard of living equivalent to Switzerland. They were not dumbed down. All of the good jobs (non-service jobs) go to Caymanis and the service jobs are done by foreigners on up to a 7 year work permit. They have a thriving middle class, an orderly run government that occasionally gets arresting for teifin' (never happens here), and a literate trained middle class.

Bahamians are dumbed down. They will sell their vote for a turkey. Not one in a hundred believes that tings will get better than they are now. Bahamians have lost the ability to hope because of criminal independence government under Lynden Oscar Swindling.

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Well_mudda_take_sic 2 years, 5 months ago

Heritage is always such a sensitive subject.

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Chucky 2 years, 5 months ago

If you wan't to blame the political parties blame the people, one for voting them in, and two for not running as candidates. What do we need either of these political parties for, lets elect a house full of independents, they can vote on legislation, perhaps we will actually get representation. Perhaps with the end of these two parties we can get a break from corruption.

As for the children, clearly those that care , work to make a difference in their own kids; simply put, like in many issues that should seriously concern citizens, the masses don't care. If they did, things would be different.

To solve a problem you have to admit and accept that you have one; the poor education system and crime are just two symptoms of a failing society. If the masses of parents were decent people, so would their children be. But when the masses are just ignorant, fat lazy, self entitled slobs, this is what you get! Harsh language, and could be said much better, but the reality of our society is much more harsh in outcome than anything I have said.

Our country is like any other, we have a percentage who care (perhaps it's as high as 20%), but we have a great majority that only concern themselves with what they perceive to be their own best interests or worse their indulgences, and these same people will not endeavour to work towards the country's future. The majority of our people are SH##.

Morals don't come from a church or from a government via legislation, they come from within; the proof is we have many churches and too much government, both riddled with their own form of corruption and neither can change our country. The important and necessary qualities come from within; if an when the masses decide to become upstanding hard working and moral people, then and only then will there be change. All the talk in the world won't do anyone any good without this!

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Cobalt 2 years, 5 months ago

Agree with you 110%!!! For years I've been telling people that the problem with the Bahamas, is the people of the Bahamas!!!

Too many of us don't read; we don't think; we're corruptible; we're selfish; and we're dishonest. More importantly we have become a nation where the majority of us are just plain dumb, ignorant, and stupid.

Tell me.... which logical, honest, self respecting persons would vote for someone like Brave Davis (who uses his influence and illegal tactics to assist murderers and drug dealers) or Leslie Miller or Bernard Nottage (all who served reverently under the drug tainted, scandal ridden tutelage of the corrupted regime of Lynden Pindling).

Bahamians continue to vote in crooks!! Then they have the nerve to complain when they're jobless, penniless, and hungry. We're reaping what we have sown! And the sensible people are suffering along with the ignorant people because ignorance is in abundance.

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duppyVAT 2 years, 5 months ago

Dont worry ............... Fitzie will put all of the juvenile misfits in the old BA school on Wulff Road .............. another novel idea .......... the reincarnation of the University of Wulff Road

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johnq 2 years, 5 months ago

Some good points made though out this thread. But if I were a reporter present while Mr. Sands were making these comments, I would ask him what exactly does he mean by poorly socialized students? Are the children savages that can't be helped? Are they a few steps above animals or what? Would he prefer that they not go to school?

In truth, that statement is not only blame shifting but it illustrates the divide that is continuing to grow through out this country. An "us" versus "them" sentiment. From politicians who take the average citizen for some type of idiot, to teachers who couldn't care less about whether students learn or not. When I attended school my principals referred to students as "their kids". They took a personal responsibility and interest in "their children's" actions. Seemingly, this kind of dedication and responsibility exist in smaller numbers, if at all. I am certainly not hearing it from Mr. Sands. Not to mention the social and structural education issues that have already been shared here.

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duppyVAT 2 years, 5 months ago

johnq .............. therein lies the problem ............ public school administrators and teachers are far better paid and given perks today as compared to two decades ago ........... but we are suffereing from the concentration on US-style central government education gimmicks instead of valuing education and empowering principals to run their schools and teachers to run their classrooms ......... and parents must take responsibility for out-of control jr/sr high school children.. but I have said enough on this issue already ................... it takes a village

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banker 2 years, 5 months ago

Are the children savages that can't be helped?

yes

politicians who take the average citizen for some type of idiot

with good cause

teachers who couldn't care less about whether students learn or not

exactly the situation

You and I can write intelligently, and do sums, and have a decent cursive script, and can transmit information in a erudite fashion. Look at this sentence posted on Facebook: "Yall cost them loose they job naaa lol petty". The person was responding to a photo of a Bahamian student attending prom in an ambulance, and her date kisses her and she wakes up.

Man if they applied half the effort to school as to prom, they wouldn't be illiterates. The sense of entitlement that Gowon Bowes talks about, is present in almost every single one of these poorly socialised "mama's lil darlins" whose mama is less than 20 years older than they are.

And as for politesse and manners of the students, here is another Facebook post about the rancid sandwich from Wendy's: "I was ga fuk that hoe up who ever gave me my order I glad I does only by vanilla ice cream". Enough Said!

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