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Tech Talk

• Refereeing at the Confederations Cup in Russia may have been chaotic at times, but Video Assistant Referees have prevented major mistakes from being made, football’s governing body says.

FIFA’s head of refereeing Massimo Busacca says video reviews have not always looked good in tests at the tournament and admitted “many aspects should be improved” including faster, clearer communication after slow reviews have confused players, coaches and fans.

“We are certain that this can reduce refereeing errors,” Busacca told a news conference.

His choice of words suggests eliminating errors completely at the World Cup is too tough a goal.

“We are convinced if used correct(ly), it can reduce many mistakes. But not eliminate. We are here only to reduce,” he said.

• A SpaceX rocket carried 10 communications satellites into orbit from California on Sunday, two days after the company successfully launched a satellite from Florida.

The Falcon 9 rocket blasted off through low-lying fog at 1:25 p.m. PDT from Vandenberg Air Force Base northwest of Los Angeles. It carried a second batch of new satellites for Iridium Communications, which is replacing its orbiting fleet with a next-generation constellation of satellites.

About 7 minutes after liftoff, the rocket’s first-stage booster returned to earth and landed on a floating platform on a ship in the Pacific Ocean, while the rocket’s second stage continued to carry the satellites toward orbit.

A SpaceX Falcon 9 on Friday launched from Cape Canaveral, Florida and boosted a communications satellite for Bulgaria into orbit.

Its first stage was recovered after landing on a drone ship in the Atlantic.

• Uber’s ride-hailing app is making it easier for its users to set up trips for seniors and others who may not know their way around a smartphone but still need help getting around town.

The new feature, coming out Tuesday in an app update, is primarily designed for Uber users who want a simple way to arrange rides for parents, grandparents and other loved ones unable to drive themselves.

Previously, Uber users ordering on behalf of another passenger had to call the driver to explain the situation.

When users ask to be picked up at somewhere besides their current location, the app will give them the option to designate the ride for someone else. The passenger won’t need the Uber app; they’ll get a text identifying the driver, car make and other information. Uber will charge the person who ordered the ride.

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