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Ub Hosts Anti-Doping Seminar For Student-Athletes

PICTURED (l-r in back row) are Sean Bastian, UB assistant athletics director, Anthony Knowles, of the BADC, Christopher Thompson, BADC doping control and education coordinator, and Christopher Saunders, UB sports information officer. In the front row (l-r) are Lael Johnson, office administrator, Petra Haven, BADC executive director, Shakeitha Henfield, UB assistant athletics trainer), Sasha Johnson, UB head athletics trainer, and Kim Rolle, UB athletics director).

PICTURED (l-r in back row) are Sean Bastian, UB assistant athletics director, Anthony Knowles, of the BADC, Christopher Thompson, BADC doping control and education coordinator, and Christopher Saunders, UB sports information officer. In the front row (l-r) are Lael Johnson, office administrator, Petra Haven, BADC executive director, Shakeitha Henfield, UB assistant athletics trainer), Sasha Johnson, UB head athletics trainer, and Kim Rolle, UB athletics director).

UNIVERSITY Athletics, in conjunction with the Bahamas Anti-Doping Commission (BADC), hosted an anti-doping seminar for student-athletes at the Michael Eldon Complex on October 11.

Petra Haven, executive director of the BADC, and her team informed the student-athletes about the substances on the prohibited lists, how tests are conducted, doping control and how athletes can assist in fighting doping in sports. “I think the student-athletes got a clear understanding of what is doping and why it’s important to fight against it to keep sports clean,” said UB head athletics trainer Sasha Johnson. “A violation is more than just taking a prohibited substance. It’s refusing a test, or having a prohibited substance and even giving someone else a prohibited substance. I’m glad our student-athletes got to learn about how far-reaching doping is in sports and how to fight it.”

The BADC, which is an independent body, promotes, coordinates and monitors the fight against doping in all sports in the country. The student-athletes also heard about how it is possible to actually take a prohibited substance with a therapeutic use exception or TUE. Sometimes athletes can use a prohibited substance for a legitimate medical reason and the commission can grant these exceptions. “These are rare but it’s important they know how to get this exception if they are sick,” Johnson added. “And even more important is the procedure to get this exception because it is not simply a case of having a doctor say it’s ok, there is a procedure.”

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