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‘We Need More Shelters For Domestic Abuse Victims’

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KHANDI Gibson, founder and president of Families of All Murder Victims.

By EARYEL BOWLEG

Tribune Staff Reporter

ebowleg@tribunemedia.net

AS public discourse surrounding domestic abuse continues in the country, an activist has called for the establishment of new shelters for victims.

According to President of Families of All Murder Victims Khandi Gibson, domestic violence is prevalent in the country for both men and women alike.

Given her experience in assisting victims, Ms Gibson said more must be done.

“We don’t have anger management no more,” she said. “We can’t contain our anger. When we’re angered, someone has to feel something. Before its even getting to the hitting part, one you would’ve detected that your spouse, your mate has a violent tendency, speak early, seek counselling.

“I would want the community to start and get involved and I feel like we need to now invest in shelters. We need to invest in shelters so where women want to flee, they could flee and go to these places.

“When you go to entities, they’ll accommodate for just a week or two weeks. You can’t rebuild your life or regroup or rethink in the space of two weeks. You still (are in) the grieving process. You (are) still uncertain. You don’t know where to go.

“A shelter would be four to six weeks. That gives you ample time to probably get your car on the road. That gives you ample time to put your children to different schools.”

Dr Calae Philippe, Department of Gender and Family Affairs director, previously spoke about the issue of safe houses.

She explained: “We also have the challenge where you go to a safe house and it’s supposed to be safe and you calling the person and you’re exposing the safe house so it’s a whole culture if we’re going to have the safe house. Even then, it’s only about two weeks that you can stay in a safe house. Where are you going if you’re financially dependent on this person? Who is going to pay your salary – the government? Who is going to take care of the child? The safe house is only a gap, only a time period then we must figure out what’s the next step.”

Public outcry was sparked when CCTV footage showed a woman, who was holding a young child, being abused in the street earlier this month.

Activists have repeatedly called for real action when it comes to curbing the occurrence of domestic violence.

Comments

carltonr61 2 weeks ago

I just got my Human Trafficking Certification and yes there is a problem that is multi agency. Also I learnt of the phenomenon of Push And Pull. Early in those relationships the female was lured and her eyes was set on a pull or love and security that promised a better life. Believing your surroundings is too bad initially pushes one from home seeking a better life. Sadness ensues on realizing you just cannot go back home and you cannot leave. Then comes the call for help. But beyond housing that is one of the elements in extreme cases in the Bahamas we live in a small circle of communication. Asylum to USA or Canada is the only option.

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joeblow 2 weeks ago

... a call for 'shelters' is a request for money.

This country is reaping the fruit of living without moral values, self discipline and an understanding personal responsibility. When uneducated children have children with reckless abandon with no social structure, the country will be converted into a ghetto filled with angry, substance addicted abusers. We have no one to blame but ourselves, for these are the seeds we sowed!

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carltonr61 1 week, 6 days ago

Absolutely. There are so matriarchal older elephants to lead the herd. The drug barons of the eighties and violent gang bangers of the nineties became male examples for women to follow thus men emulated the power women gave them. The sacrifices, spirituality and toughness needed is betrayed by success means having the latest things. No one is guiding our women. The first green flash is smell of money and they seek after it in a rat race unconcerned about simple stability. The latest fad among females is jook him up craze talk.

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sheeprunner12 1 week, 6 days ago

Seventy percent of our children are born out of wedlock ...... Are women still not empowered to control their sexuality to that extent? All of that cannot be non-consensual sex or "rape" for sure ..... That's women "lying down with dogs and catching fleas". Puppy love and looking for love cannot be excuses to end up with four children at 25 with 3 baby daddies and no job or house to live in ...... Women have to take more control of their bodies ( regardless of feelings)

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sheeprunner12 1 week, 6 days ago

Suggestion ........ Tell Obie buy the Corner Motel on Carmichael Road and house these domestic abuse victims

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FrustratedBusinessman 1 week, 6 days ago

She explained: “We also have the challenge where you go to a safe house and it’s supposed to be safe and you calling the person and you’re exposing the safe house so it’s a whole culture if we’re going to have the safe house. Even then, it’s only about two weeks that you can stay in a safe house. Where are you going if you’re financially dependent on this person? Who is going to pay your salary – the government? Who is going to take care of the child? The safe house is only a gap, only a time period then we must figure out what’s the next step.”

This is something that is rarely touched on as well. This is where having a proper family structure comes into play. The death of Bahamian society was brought about with the destruction of the family unit.

My pieces of advice to women are :

1.) If he looks like the kind of man to hit you, don't get involved with him. You can't turn a gangster into a saint.

2.) Have a proper family/church support network if possible. You can't control if your parents split or something, but at least have a cousin or church sister than you can depend on for a period of time if the worst happens.

3.) Stop having kids out of wedlock. If he won't marry you, he isn't worth having a child with. The Bible condemns fornication for many good reasons.

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